DC Students for STEM Education

Since January of 2014 I've been working with student-run 501c3 non-profit organization, DC Students for STEM Education, who aim to improve the education of the fields of science, technology, engineering and math in K-12 grades in the greater DC area and beyond. It's been a truly great experience so far and has helped me advance my editing and cinematography skills even further. I've edited under deadline and filmed in strict, often less than optimal, conditions and gotten to capture the learning minds of children on video.

Below, you'll see a collection of videos from our summer project with the Jubilee Housing Project, a non-profit organization whose mission it is to provide affordable housing to economically disadvantaged residents of the Adams Morgan neighborhood in Washington, D.C.

Additionally, the Jubilee Housing Project provide an education program for their residents' children and DC Students for STEM began implementing a curriculum once a week for a portion of the summer.

I'm very excited to continue working with DC Students for STEM, bring scientific literacy to bright young minds and expand my portfolio improve their videos as my personal equipment arsenal increases. 

Our pilot episode featured a classic experiment: rubbing a balloon against your hair and witnessing a static charge. We aimed, and continue to aim, to not only educate DC's children in these fields but to make them excited about becoming educated in these fields.

For our second lesson, we partnered with Bricks 4 Kidz, another local non-profit to bring the children of the Jubilee Housing Project a demonstration in mechanical engineering through specially designed lego tool kits. The kids had a blast and DC Students for STEM was able to surprise the children and supervisors with a special donation, thanks to fundraising they did earlier this year.

Hookbuzz

Starting in the summer of 2014, I've had the pleasure of working with Hookbuzz at Hookbuzz.com. I worked under Clark McNulty as primarily video editing intern but also worked designing some graphics and motion graphics. I learned a good deal about color correction vs. color grading and about motion tracking and stabilization.

The footage was primarily shot by Clark McNulty and it is some of the most exciting and fresh video I've had the pleasure of working with. 

Below you'll find two of the videos I've edited and animated, which are or will be featured on Hookbuzz's YouTube channel, and an online advertisement that I designed which was featured on the Hookbuzz Facebook page.



COMM 250: Digital Imaging

Below are some samples of graphic design work that I completed in the Spring 2014 semester for my Digital Imaging Class.

Above is a design for an app logo I came up with as part of an assignment for class. The design features an aperture logo inside of a moon and a sun, depicting two different lighting scenarios. 

In essence, the app functions would function as a light meter for a camera. While the app is running you can take a photo with the iphone camera and it will read the required aperture and shutter speed settings that one would need to use in order to get a proper exposure or an exposure based on the type that a user selects from a dropdown (underexposed, day, night, shade, etc.) In addition, the app is an exposure correction app. It can shoot day for night and vice-versa if a photo is too underexposed or overexposed for the preferences of the user. With both functions, it turns your iphone camera into a great tool to bring along with you when taking more professional photos without having to carry around a traditional, bulky light meter wherever your shoot. 

 


Above is a poster for a fictional movie I came up with as part of an assignment for class. A constant futuristic technology feel is highlighted through the use of a steel textured background, handwritten equations digitally scanned and blended, and a photo I took of a camera battery doubling as a futuristic sci-fi prop. There is a sense of urgency and the tagline, "What would you go back for?" gives subtle clues as to the potential drama that could unfold in this film's potential plot.

Above is a poster for a fictional movie I came up with as part of an assignment for class. A constant futuristic technology feel is highlighted through the use of a steel textured background, handwritten equations digitally scanned and blended, and a photo I took of a camera battery doubling as a futuristic sci-fi prop. There is a sense of urgency and the tagline, "What would you go back for?" gives subtle clues as to the potential drama that could unfold in this film's potential plot.